Home  |  Board of Governors  |  Disclaimer  |  Español
Numismatic Legacy of Mexico: Series II

Distributors (PDF)

 

This fine collection of coins represents about five centuries of the numismatic heritage of Mexico. In the collection you can find the famous first pieces minted in Mexico during the sixteenth century or the beautiful Mexican coins of the twentieth century. The mere contemplation of the coins in this collection may be compared to a journey through the most intense episodes in the history of Mexico, while allowing an overview of Mexican art. Of course, it is also a precious treasure for numismatic experts.

At the center, a sculptural relief of the National Shield encompassed by the legend “Estados Unidos Mexicanos”. Smooth rim.


Case with Series II coins

 

 
Common obverse

Counterstamped and chopped colonial coin, 8 reales, 1804, Philippines countermark and chop marks

At the center, the image of the obverse of a colonial coin, 8 reales, Charles III, 1804, Philippine countermark and chop marks,; at the upper side, parallel to the coin frame, the legend “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC HERITAGE OF MEXICO); on the left side, the Mexican mint mark, while on the right field is the “$” sign followed by the number “100”, dotted edging. Smooth rim.

chops
 Reverse

Counterstamped coin in the Far East (Viceroyalty, 8 reales, 1804, M° mintmark, Philippines reseal and silver chops)

Since the XVI century, the silver Mexican coin was broadly accepted in the Far East. It was so highly sought after that Chinese metal smiths and craftsmen forged it unreservedly. To avoid counterfeit coins, Chinese users verified the coin’s silver content and, the authentic ones, were resealed with chops in order to distinguish them from counterfeit coins. In the Philippines, to validate coin circulation in the islands, the colonial government stamped a circular countermark in them, which consisted of a crown and the initials F.7.°, in allusion to King Fernando VII.

chops original reverso
 Reverse
chops original anverso 
 Obverse

Philip III cob colonial coin, 8 reales, 1608, assayer F

At the center, the image of the obverse of a colonial coin, 8 reales, 1608, M° mintmark, assayer F, cob type; at the upper side, parallel to the coin frame, the legend “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC HERITAGE OF MEXICO); on the left side, the Mexican mint mark, while on the right field is the “$” sign followed by the number “100”, dotted edging. Smooth rim.

Macuquina
 Reverse

Cob coin (Felipe III, 8 reales, 1608, M° mintmark, silver)

The Coins that were minted in Mexico between 1572 and 1730 were of the cob type; that is, they were minted manually with a hammer on tokens with irregular shapes and widths. Despite their rough aspect, they were highly accepted among the public, due to the purity of their metal (930.5 thousandths of silver). The piece represented in this coin corresponds to the second year in which the mint year was included in its mark.

Macuquina original reverso
Reverse
Macuquina original anverso 
 Obverse

Royalist provisional coin, 8 reales, 1811, “L.V.O.”, first type

At the center, the image of the obverse of a colonial coin, 8 reales, provisional realist, 1811, struck in Zacatecas, "LVO" first type; at the upper side, parallel to the coin frame, the legend “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC HERITAGE OF MEXICO); on the left side, the Mexican mint mark, while on the right field is the “$” sign followed by the number “100”, dotted edging. Smooth rim.

LVO
 Reverse

Provisional realist coin (8 reales, 1811, Zacatecas mintmark, first type L.V.O.)

During the Independence War, transporting precious metals from the mines to Mexico’s Mint became difficult. In response, in several mining cities Provisional Houses were established, like in Zacatecas, where a large number of silver coins were produced. In 1811, rustic hill-type coins, where the hills of La Bufa and El Grillo can be seen, were minted, accompanied with the initials L.V.O. (Labor Vincint Omnia; in latin, Work Conquers All), and the inscription MONEDA PROVISIONAL DE ZACATECAS (“PROVISIONAL COIN OF ZACATECAS”).

LVO original reverso
 Reverse
LVO original anverso 
 Obverse

Second Empire coin, 1 peso, 1866

At the center, the image of the obverse of Second Empire coin, 1 peso, 1866, M° mintmark; at the upper side, parallel to the coin frame, the legend “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC HERITAGE OF MEXICO); on the left side, the Mexican mint mark, while on the right field is the “$” sign followed by the number “100”, dotted edging. Smooth rim.

Maximiliano
 Reverse

Second Empire coin (1 peso, 1866, M° mintmark, silver)

Ignacio Comonfort and Benito Juárez tried to introduce the use of a decimal system in Mexico’s minting. However, the difficulties at the time barely allowed putting into circulation 5 and 10 cent coins in 1863. Emperor Maximilian of Habsburg, in 1866, was the first to order the minting of one-peso coins in Mexico. During the Second Empire, decimal coins of 1 cent (copper), 5, 10 and 50 cents (silver), and 20 pesos (gold) were minted.

Maximiliano original reverso
 Reverse
Maximiliano original anverso 
 Obverse

Republican hand on book coin, 8 escudos, 1828

At the center, the image of the obverse of a Republican coin, 8 escudos, “little hand coin” type, 1828, M° mintmark, assayer initials JM; at the upper side, parallel to the coin frame, the legend “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC HERITAGE OF MEXICO); on the left side, the Mexican mint mark, while on the right field is the “$” sign followed by the number “100”, dotted edging. Smooth rim.

Tipo Manita
 Reverse

Gold republican coin (8 escudos, 1828, M° mintmark, gold)

When the Mexican Republic was formed at the beginning of 1823, the characteristics of national coins were established. They would all have a common obverse, the national seal; and the reverse of the gold coins would have a right arm holding in a stick a Phrygian cap, on top of an open code with the inscription LEY (“LAW”); which altogether would be surrounded by the inscription LA LIBERTAD EN LA LEY (“LIBERTY UNDER THE LAW”), the denomination, the place where coins were minted, the minting year, the tester’s initials, and the fineness (21 karat). These coins were popularly known as “de manita” (“little hand coin”).

tipo manita original reverso
 Reverse
tipo manita original anverso 
 Obverse

United Mexican States coin, 5 pesos, 1950, Southeast Railroad

At the center, the image of the reverse of a United Mexican States coin, 5 pesos, 1950, Inauguration of the Southeastern Railway, M° mintmark; at the upper side, parallel to the coin frame, the legend “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC HERITAGE OF MEXICO); on the left side, the Mexican mint mark, while on the right field is the “$” sign followed by the number “100”, dotted edging. Smooth rim. 

ferrocarril sureste
 Reverse

Commemorative coin of the inauguration of the Southeast Railway (5 pesos, 1950, M° mintmark, silver)

In 1950, the former President, Miguel Alemán, inaugurated the Southeast Railway, the most important infrastructure work that integrated the Yucatán peninsula to the rest of the country. This magnificent work began under Lázaro Cárdenas administration and was continued by Manuel Ávila Camacho. The pinnacle of such an important project for the nation has been engraved for posterity in one of the most beautiful coins of Mexico’s XX century: El Ferrocarril del Sureste (“The Southeast Railway”).

ferrocarril sureste original reverso
 Reverse
ferrocarril sureste original anverso 
 Obverse

Technical information

Year of mintage 2012
Face value 100 pesos
Diameter 39.0 mm
Edge Interrupted milled
Quality Proof-like
Composition Bimetallic
  • Peripheral ring: Bronze-aluminum
  • Center: Sterling silver
      • Fineness: 0.925
      • Weight: 16.812 grams
Total weight 33.967 grams