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Numismatic Legacy of Mexico: Series III

Distributors (PDF)

 

This fine collection of coins represents about five centuries of the numismatic heritage of Mexico. In the collection you can find the famous first pieces minted in Mexico during the sixteenth century or the beautiful Mexican coins of the twentieth century. The mere contemplation of the coins in this collection may be compared to a journey through the most intense episodes in the history of Mexico, while allowing an overview of Mexican art. Of course, it is also a precious treasure for numismatic experts.

At the center, a sculptural relief of the National Shield encompassed by the legend “Estados Unidos Mexicanos”. Smooth rim.


Case with Series III coins

 

 
Common obverse

Zapata revolutionary coin, 2 pesos, 1915

At the center, the reverse of a 2 peso Zapatista coin from Suriana, minted in 1915; at the upper side, parallel to the coin frame, the legend “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC HERITAGE OF MEXICO); on the left side, the Mexican mint mark, while on the right field is the “$” sign followed by the number “100”, dotted edging. The frame is flat.


 Reverse

Zapatista coin from Suriana (2 pesos, 1915, Gro mint mark, silver)

In the heat of the battle, the Zapatista troops cast a small number of silver coins in the mineral deposit of Suriana, Guerrero, to overcome the scarcity of currency during the Mexican Revolution. These coins have a distinctive Zapatista design: a smoking volcano, mountains and, in the background, a glowing sun in the form of a human face; altogether surrounded by the inscription REFORMA (Reform) LIBERTAD (Liberty), JUSTICIA (Justice) Y LEY (and Law), and the word SURIANA, in the exergue. Its finish reveals the poor conditions under which coins were fabricated during Mexico’s revolutionary movement.


 Reverse
 
 Obverse

Carlos & Johanna colonial coin, 3 reales (dots denomination), assayer R, early series

At the center, the image of the reverse of a Carlos & Johanna colonial coin, 3 reales (dots denomination), assayer R, early series; at the upper side, parallel to the coin frame, the legend “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC HERITAGE OF MEXICO); on the left side, the Mexican mint mark, while on the right field is the “$” sign followed by the number “100”, dotted edging. The frame is flat.


 Reverse

Carlos y Juana coin from early series (3 real, M° mint mark, assayer’s initial R, silver)

As of 1536, the first coins to be minted in the Mexican Mint were known as “Carlos y Juana” (Charles and Joanna), because they included the inscription CAROLVS ET IOHANA REGES HISPANIARVM ET INDIARVM (Charles and Joanna, King and Queen of Spain and the Indies). This type of coins was cast during the reign of Joanna I of Castile and Charles I of Spain (V of Germany) and Phillip II. The first pieces were assayed by Francisco del Rincón, whose initial R appears between the Pillars of Hercules, next to the emblem PLVS VLTRA (beyond). The denomination in this piece is expressed in dots.


Reverse
 
 Obverse

Republican radiant cap above scales, 1 peso, assayer H

At the center, the image of the reverse of a Republican radiant cap above scales, 1 peso coin, assayer H; at the upper side, parallel to the coin frame, the legend “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC HERITAGE OF MEXICO); on the left side, the Mexican mint mark, while on the right field is the “$” sign followed by the number “100”, dotted edging. The frame is flat.


 Reverse

Moneda de balanza (scale of justice coin) (1 peso, Zs mint mark, silver)

In 1857, the liberals adopted the decimal metric system in Mexico. However, it was not fully implemented in coinage until the Republic was restored. The decimal pieces in gold and silver are known as “balanzas” (scale of justice), due to their design in their reverse, which has a republican allegory, formed by a sword (Executive branch), an open code with the word LEY (Law, Legislative branch) and a scale (Judiciary); and above all of these, a Phrygian cap with solar beams and the word LIBERTAD (Liberty). These coins were minted in Mexico and in the foreign mints. These pieces were struck in Zacatecas, where they were coined between 1870 and 1873.


 Reverse
 
 Obverse

Republican cap and rays coin, 8 reales, chop marked

At the center, the image of the reverse of a Republican cap and rays coin, 8 reales, chop marked; at the upper side, parallel to the coin frame, the legend “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC HERITAGE OF MEXICO); on the left side, the Mexican mint mark, while on the right field is the “$” sign followed by the number “100”, dotted edging. The frame is flat.


 Reverse

Republican coin counter-stamped in the Far East (8 real, Ca mint mark, assayer’s initials M.M.,
chop marked, silver)

After the independence was gained, Mexico adopted constitutional monarchy as its form of government. Agustín de Iturbide became the first Mexican emperor and rapidly ordered the minting of its own coin. On the front of these pieces there is the monarch’s naked bust-head figure, surrounded by the inscription AUGUSTINUS DEI PROVIDENTIA (Agustín by God’s providence), Mexico´s mint mark and the mint year. Four- and eight-escudo coins were cast in gold, and eight-, four-, two- and one-real coins in silver.


 Reverse
 
 Obverse

Insurgent coin of the Supreme National Congress of America, 8 reales, 1811

At the center, the image of the obverse of an Insurgent coin of the Supreme National Congress of America, 8 reales, silver, 1811; at the upper side, parallel to the coin frame, the legend “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC HERITAGE OF MEXICO); on the left side, the Mexican mint mark, while on the right field is the “$” sign followed by the number “100”, dotted edging. The frame is flat.


 Reverse

Insurgent coin of the Supreme American Governing Board (8 real, 1811, silver)

In May 1811, during the main struggle for Independence, the insurgents installed a governing board headed by the patriot Ignacio López Rayón. The Junta de Zitácuaro, as it is also known, decided to mint coins to alleviate the scarcity of money at the time. The pieces were cast under the name of Fernando VII (Ferdinand VII), who was captured by the French troops, and they include the figure of an eagle standing on a nopal cactus growing out from a bridge. The coins from the Junta were minted in silver and copper.


 Reverse
 
 Obverse

First Empire coin, 8 escudos, 1822, first type

At the center, the image of the obverse of a First Empire coin, 8 escudos, 1822, minted in Mexico, first type; at the upper side, parallel to the coin frame, the legend “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC HERITAGE OF MEXICO); on the left side, the Mexican mint mark, while on the right field is the “$” sign followed by the number “100”, dotted edging. The frame is flat. 


 Reverse

First Empire coin (8 escudo, 1822, M° mint mark, first type, gold)

After the independence was gained, Mexico adopted constitutional monarchy as its form of government. Agustín de Iturbide became the first Mexican emperor and rapidly ordered the minting of its own coin. On the front of these pieces there is the monarch’s naked bust-head figure, surrounded by the inscription AUGUSTINUS DEI PROVIDENTIA (Agustín by God’s Providence); Mexico´s mint mark and the mint year. Eight- and four-escudo coins were minted in gold, and eight-, four-, two- and one-real coins in silver.


 Reverse
 
 Obverse

Technical information

Year of mintage 2013
Face value 100 pesos
Diameter 39.0 mm
Edge Interrupted milled
Quality Proof-like
Composition Bimetallic
  • Peripheral ring: Bronze-aluminum
  • Center: Sterling silver
      • Fineness: 0.925
      • Weight: 16.812 grams
Total weight 33.967 grams