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Numismatic Legacy of Mexico: Series I

Distributors (PDF)

 

Almost five centuries of Mexican numismatic legacy are enshrined in this beautiful coin collection which includes famous coins ranging from the first coins minted by la Casa de Moneda de México, the Mexican Mint, during the XVI century, to contemporary XX century mints. The collection not only offers insight into the evolution of the Mexican coin, but is also a window on our History and art, besides fostering coin collecting and numismatics.

On the reverse side of these coins is a raised sculpture of the National Emblem and in a semi-circle above it the inscription: "ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS" (UNITED MEXICAN STATES). Smooth rim.

anverso común
Case with Series I coins

 

anverso común
Common obverse

Coins of Worlds and Seas

In the middle is the image of the reverse side of an 8 real vice-regal rounded coin of 1732; in the upper field next to the rim the inscription “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC LEGACY OF MEXICO); in the left field the Mexican Mint Mark; in the right field the issuance date; in the exergue the sign “$” followed by the number “100”, pearled dentil. Smooth rim.

moneda columnario
 Reverse

Coins of Worlds and Seas (Philip V, 8 reals, 1732, M° mint, silver)

The arrival of the Borbons to the Spanish throne brought about a profound transformation and modernization of the Empire. In 1732, during the second reign of Philip V, minting underwent a significant change with the introduction of the flying press in Mexico, which permitted the production of round coins with a protective cord. That is how Coins of Worlds and Seas came into being whose fine ore and beauty made the Mexican coin the main medium of international payment.

columnario original reverso
 Reverse
columnario original anverso 
Obverse 

Busted Coins

In the center the image of the reverse side of an 8 real vice-regal coin showing the bust of Charles III, 1783; in the upper field adjacent to the rim the inscription “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC LEGACY OF MEXICO); in the left field the Mexican Mint Mark, in the right field the issuance date; in the exergue the sign “$” followed by the number “100”, pearled dentil. Smooth rim.

moneda de busto
 Reverse

Busted coins (Charles III, 8 reals, 1783, M° mint, silver)

As of 1772, during the reign of Charles Carlos III, busted coins appeared in Mexico with a portrait of the monarch on their reverse sides after the fashion of European absolutism. In order to produce these coins, on March 18th, 1771, mint workers were secretly ordered to reduce the silver ore from eleven pieces (916.66 thousandths) to ten pieces twenty grains (902.77 thousandths), and at the same time the minting of coins of worlds and seas was suspended.

busto original reverso
Reverse
busto original anverso 
 Obverse 

Morelos SUD Coins

In the center the image of the reverse side of an 8 real copper SUD type insurgent coin; in the upper field next to the rim the inscription “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC LEGACY OF MEXICO); in the left field the Mexican Mint Mark; in the right field the issuance date; in the exergue the sign “$” followed by the number “100”, pearled dentil. Smooth rim.

moneda Morelos SUD
 Reverse

Morelos SUD Coins (8 reals, copper)

To alleviate the lack of cash to pay and feed his troops, José María Morelos y Pavón ordered that his own coins be minted. Thus copper coins equivalent to “coupons” or “promises to pay” were minted that would be exchanged for silver or gold at the end of the war. Consequently, such coins are considered Mexico’s first fiduciary coins and due to their design, the first real Mexican coins.

Morelos SUD original reverso
 Reverse
Morelos SUD original anverso 
 Obverse 

Republican Shiners

In the center the image of the reverse side of an 8 real republican shiner, 1824, Durango mint, assayer R.L., in the upper field next to the rim the inscription “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC LEGACY OF MEXICO), in the left field the Mexican Mint Mark, in the right field the issuance date; in the exergue the sign “$” followed by the number “100”, pearled dentil. Smooth rim.

moneda resplandor republicano
 Reverse

Republican coin (8 reals, 1824, D° Mint, assayer’s initials  R.L., silver)

In 1823 coins of the recently created Mexican Republic began to be minted. In that year it was decreed that the national emblem would be included on the reserve sides of all coins and that the reserve side of silver coins would display an image of a Phrygian cap with the word FREEDOM on the front and Republican shiners on the back. The original die-cutters were stamped by José Guerrero and used in Mexico’s Durango and Guanajuato mints. The Republican shiners are the reason Mexicans ask Eagle or Sun? when they toss a coin.

Resplandor original reverso
 Reverse
Resplandor original anverso 
 Obverse 

Peso de Caballito (Miniature horse peso)

In the center, the image of the reverse side of a one peso coin of the United Mexican States, 1914, of the miniature horse type; in the upper field next to the rim the inscription “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC LEGACY OF MEXICO); in the left field the Mint of Mexico, in the right field the issuance date; in the exergue the sign “$” followed by the number “100”, pearled dentil. Smooth rim.

moneda peso de caballito
 Reverse

Peso de Caballito (Miniature horse peso) (1 peso, 1914, M° Mint, silver)

This beautiful coin, the first commemorative coin of its kind in Mexico, was minted to celebrate the centenary of the War of Independence. It was designed by the French artist Charles Pillet. It is known as a miniature horse peso because of the horseback rider of Freedom holding a laurel branch in his right hand and a torch in his left; in the background there is a bright sun and in the exergue the mint year.

peso Caballito original reverso
 Reverse
peso Caballito original anverso 
 Obverse 

Peso de Bolita (little ball)

In the center is the image of the reverse side of a Villa little ball shaped coin of 1913 minted in Hidalgo del Parral, Chihuahua; in the upper field next to the rim is the inscription “HERENCIA NUMISMÁTICA DE MÉXICO” (NUMISMATIC LEGACY OF MEXICO); in the left field the Mint of Mexico, in the right field the issuance date; in the exergue the sign “$” followed by the number “100”, pearled dentil. Smooth rim. 

moneda peso de bolita
 Reverse

Peso de Bolita (little ball) (1 peso, 1913, Hidalgo del Parral, Chih., silver)

The little ball peso is one of the most famous coins of the Mexican Revolution (so called for the circle over the denomination). The coin was part of the first Villa mint and was probably ordered by Francisco Villa himself or by General Maclovio Herrera in October 1913. Its rough cut reflects the precarious conditions in which most coins were minted during the Revolution.

peso Bolita original reverso
 Reverse
peso Bolita Original anverso 
 Obverse 

Technical characteristics

Year of mintage 2011
Face value 100 pesos
Diameter 39.0 mm
Edge Interrupted milled
Finish Proof-like
Composition Bimetallic
  • Peripheral ring: Bronze-aluminum
  • Center: Sterling silver
    • Fineness: 0.925
    • Weight: 16.812 grams
Total weight 33.967 grams