Home  |  Board of Governors  |  Disclaimer  |  Español
Iberoamerican series

Distributors (PDF)

 

I Series: Columnaria

One of the faces of the Mexican coin is inspired on the silver coin called "Real de Plata", which amply circulated worldwide. On the obverse side, it bears the National Shield surrounded by the shields of other participant countries.


Reverse

Obverse

II Series: Golfina turtle

This piece is part of the second series of commemorative coins celebrating the Fifth Centennial of the Encounter of two Worlds. It has motifs of animals in danger of being extinguished from the fauna of each participating country. The theme of the Mexican coin is the Golfina turtle (Leopidochelus Olivacea), a species which is about to disappear due to the vast commercial exploitation. Beaches of the Pacific Ocean such as those in the states of Sinaloa, Nayarit, Colima, Jalisco, Guerrero and Oaxaca were used by tortoises to lay their eggs. Every year and up until the decade of the 70's, more than one hundred thousand female turtles used to arrive each year.


Reverse

Obverse

III Series: Jarabe Tapatío

This coin is dedicated to one of the most representative Mexican folk-dances. Its history dates back since the XV century in Spain, where people used to dance in a very animated three rhythm beat. Mexico as well as the rest of the Spanish colonies inherited this influence and people started to compose songs an dances similar to Spain's Jarabe Gitano. These type of dances became very popular among the residents of the New Spain during 1683. The main theme of the songs and dances was to mock and make mordant remarks about politicians, authorities, nobility and the church.

Generally, this type of dances were forbidden until its choreography was dignified by the Jarabe Tapatio in 1780 and 1790. Very similar in rhythm to those from its ancestors, the Jarabe Tapatío distinguished itself by the elegance of the steps and the sobriety of the dancers' movements, since they must gracefully make different drawings with their feet on a wooden platform, keeping the rest of the body in an upright position, while the legs are rapidly moving keeping the step of the dance.


Reverse

Obverse

IV Series: The Ride of the Death

The theme for this Series was "The Man and His Horse" and the design for this coin represents the locally well-known horse ride called "Paso de la Muerte" (The ride of the death), in which a "charro" (Mexican cowboy) jumps from one horse to another while they are running simultaneously. On the obverse side, it bears the National Shield surrounded by the coat of arms of other participant countries.


Reverse

Obverse

V Series: Acapulco galleon

This coin, dedicated to the theme of "Navigation", depicts a scene that shows the "Galeón de Acapulco" (Acapulco Galleon) navigating through the sea, pointing to Acapulco's Bay. On the left side there is a detail of the Asian Continent, where the Philippines are located. At the bottom, there is the representation of two men exchanging their goods, activity that symbolizes the cultural link between the two continents. On the obverse side, it bears the National Shield surrounded by the shields of other participant countries.


Reverse

Obverse

VI Series: Palace of Fine Arts

Under the theme “Architecture and Monuments”, Mexico participated along with Argentina, Cuba, Ecuador, Spain, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Perú, and Portugal in the VI Hispanic-American series.

The coin shows in its reverse the Art Nouveau/Decó “Palacio de Bellas Artes” (Palace of Fine Arts) of Mexico City, considered as one of the most important and biggest theaters in the world. The Italian architect, Adamo Boari, started the building project and it was concluded by the Mexican architect Federico Mariscal.


Reverse

Obverse

VII Series: Olympic Disciplines in which Mexico has won gold medals

This coin, dedicated to "The Olympic Games in Ibero-American Countries" pays tribute to the Mexican athletes who have obtained gold medals in their respective Olympic disciplines. The participating countries in this VII Series are: Argentina, Cuba, Ecuador, Spain, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, and Portugal.

The coin reverse depicts the figure of an ancient “Jugador de Pelota” (ball player) in action, from the classical period of Mayan culture of Chichén Itzá, with his ritual clothing (feathered plume, earmuffs, jade-stone necklace, jaguar leather cloths over the “taparrabo” that covers his chest and hip, knee pad, wristband and sandals, also made of leather, as well as a rubber sphere (ball)). On the right side, between 13 vertical lines, the silhouettes of the six Olympic disciplines in which Mexico has won gold medals appear. These disciplines are: equestrian, diving, athletics, box, swimming and weightlifting.


Reverse

Obverse

VIII Series: Iberoamerican History Coins

The reverse side of the coin shows a fragment of the "Carta Marina Nvova Tavola" by Girolamo Ruscelli, which appeared for the first time in 1562 and formed part of the author’s “Geographical Work” published in Venice in 1598. Strictly speaking, it is a portolan chart (a collection of maps of various sea ports bound together in an atlas). The first map is reproduced on the obverse and reverse side of a one-peso silver coin popularly known as "Peso Caballito", which is considered Mexico’s first commemorative coin minted in 1909 to commemorate one hundred years since the beginning of Mexico’s Independence.

The following countries (in alphabetical order) participate in this numismatic series of limited edition: Argentina, Cuba, Spain, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Peru, and Portugal.


Reverse

Obverse

Technical information

Silver Quality Diámeter (mm) Fineness
Columnaria Proof 40.0 .925
Golfina Turtle Proof 40.0 .925
Jarabe Tapatío Proof 40.0 .925
The Ride of the Death Proof 40.0 .925
Acapulco Galleon Proof 40.0 .925
Palace of Fine Arts Proof 40.0 .925
Olympic Disciplines in which Mexico has won gold medals Proof 40.0 .925
Iberoamerican History Coins Proof 40.0 .925